Corporate Accountability Through Compliance

Following a decade of deregulation, defense industry procurement scandals, and savings and loan crisis, corporate malfeasance captured the attention of the American public in the early 1990s. In response to these scandals and increasing prosecution of corporations, the US Sentencing Commission enacted federal sentencing guidelines for organizations in November 1991. The guidelines articulated that an “Effective Compliance and Ethics Program” would “promote an organizational culture that encourages ethical conduct and a commitment to compliance with the law.”

A decade later, the dire need for such organizational culture continued to be highlighted in a string of corporate scandals that included Enron, Arthur Andersen, WorldCom, and Tyco. As a response to these scandals, companies developed their compliance functions to prevent and detect misconduct before the misconduct grew into scandals that would devastate investors and employees.

Continue reading “Corporate Accountability Through Compliance”

PLAP Executive Board Statement on Michelle Jones

Last week, the news broke that Harvard administrators shamefully overrode the History Department’s decision to admit Michelle Jones, a formerly incarcerated woman, into its doctoral program. In a comment as revealing as it is reprehensible, one of the professors who urged university administrators to override the history department’s decision expressed to the New York Times the concern that “Fox News would probably say that P.C. liberal Harvard gave 200 grand of funding to a child murderer, who also happened to be a minority.”

Continue reading “PLAP Executive Board Statement on Michelle Jones”

College Football Previews, Week 4

After last week’s (admittedly poorly thought out) preview of canceled games, we return to real, actual, football games you can watch this weekend. What defines this week, compared to so many others, is the upset potential dynamic at work here. Three of the games featured here involve very interesting teams which will probably lose. Whether the result of a dynamic new head coach, a slow, steady climb up the division ranks, or by being Iowa, these teams have carved out a unique spot in the college football landscape for themselves in this season. Though each team is individually likely to lose, the chance that one of them pulls off a dramatic upset is relatively high. These are games worth looking forward to.

Continue reading “College Football Previews, Week 4”

Stepping Out of Line: Trans Activism at Harvard Law

When I was growing up, I had little knowledge of how to get to college because nobody in my family had ever gone to one. I was lucky that my public school counselor pushed my mom and dad to let me apply to a private middle and high school, and that my new school offered financial aid and college counseling.

So, I joined the Army JROTC in ninth grade because the lieutenant colonel gave an amazing presentation to eighth graders (and because I wanted to roll around in the mud like they did in Cadet Kelly). I learned that the military could be a potential avenue for me to reach a better future through ROTC in college and JAG during and after law school. JROTC helped me to dream big, opened up four years of many wonderful and difficult experiences, and brought more friends into my life.

Continue reading “Stepping Out of Line: Trans Activism at Harvard Law”

It’s Okay to Not be Okay at HLS

My partner Hil has a mantra that she often tells herself: “It is okay to not be okay.” I’ve always avoided applying that to my own life, no matter how supportive I am of the idea. But this year, I am working to embrace that fully.

The summer before my 1L year, I flew out of my friend’s wedding in Madison, Wisconsin because I had called 911 on my mother. She had called me saying that she wanted to die and had gone over to the neighbor’s house to write a will.

Frantic, I called the first number that came to mind and told them my mother was trying to kill herself. I asked if they could try to get an ambulance that’s under our insurance, but they only made false reassurances.

Continue reading “It’s Okay to Not be Okay at HLS”

Administration’s Rejection of Formerly Incarcerated Student a Loss for the Harvard Community

As two graduate students new to the Harvard community, we came to Harvard for the same reasons many students did: a passion for inquiry, a desire to pursue excellent and truthful research, and a conscientious hope to work with integrity in the public interest.

We both previously worked for the City of New York, and during that time we helped run an organization teaching competitive debate on Rikers Island, the Rikers Debate Project.

We are dismayed to read about the Graduate School of Arts and Science’s acceptance — and subsequent rejection — of prospective history Ph.D. candidate Michelle Jones. Scholars such as Michelle Jones are most certainly, in the words of Harvard President Drew Faust, among the “most talented students and faculty” this university claims it must “attract and support.” The Department of History agreed, until Harvard’s top brass seemingly thought otherwise.

Continue reading “Administration’s Rejection of Formerly Incarcerated Student a Loss for the Harvard Community”

NFL Previews: Week 2

Week 1 is in the history books, but not before offering surprise upsets (pour one out, Patriots nation) and highlight-reel plays.

Here are some exciting matchups for next week.

  1. Minnesota at Pittsburgh: Sunday, September 17th at 1:00 PM on FOX

This early matchup will pit the up-and-coming Vikings in the NFC North against the perennial contenders AFC North Steelers. The Minnesota defence, led by cornerback Xavier Rhodes, will look to make a statement against the vaunted Pittsburgh offense which features Le’Veon Bell and Antonio Brown. Pittsburgh will look to bounce back from last week’s surprisingly narrow 21-18 victory over the Cleveland Browns. One or both of these teams is likely to make the playoffs this year, and this game could be a preview of things to come.

Continue reading “NFL Previews: Week 2”

College Football Previews, Week 3: What Could Have Been

This week, we are trying to do something different. Usually, we cover the week’s most interesting looking football games. However, this week has seen a relatively limited slate of quality games. Indeed, the third best game of this week is probably Missouri against Purdue (after Clemson – Louisville and Florida – Tennessee). So we decided to try something different. This week, we will ask what could have been, and cover the games that aren’t going to be played, because of Hurricane Irma. At least next week will probably be better.

Continue reading “College Football Previews, Week 3: What Could Have Been”

Record Retrospective: #SaveNelly

A year ago, our editor-in-chief and another 2L advocated on the behalf of Nelly, a recording artist who at the time owed the IRS and the state of Missouri millions of dollars.

#SaveNelly by Jim An ’18

Despite the fact that Nelly was one of the best-selling artists of the 2000s, he apparently owes the IRS a $2.4 million tax bill and may be having trouble paying it off. Based on the figures for royalties per stream, some websites have estimated that Nelly needs somewhere between 287 to 400 million streams to pay off his debts. However, as any tax student knows, Nelly will owe more taxes on these royalties, so he’d actually need as many as 660 million streams in order to pay off his debts. Anyway, if you’re in the mood to help Nelly out, here are the ten best Nelly songs to stream.

Continue reading “Record Retrospective: #SaveNelly”

The Necessity of Democratizing Law

The main principle of democracy is grounded in the idea that people should take part in political decision-making. Although there are a host of factors in “democratic” nations that fly in the face of this and like principles, an especially conspicuous one is the inaccessibility of law. And while there are many ways to democratize the law, an initial step would be to incorporate it into mandatory education.

Continue reading “The Necessity of Democratizing Law”

Letter to the Editor: The Turning Point of Self-Loathing

I am a second cousin, seven times removed, of President George Washington. And I am African-American.

While traveling to Charlottesville on July 26, 2017, I saw a portrait of General Washington kneeling in prayer at Valley Forge. The image stayed with me as an expression of faith in the Valley of the Shadow of Death. I made a mental note to purchase the portrait for Christmas.

When I returned home to San Diego, I shared my idea with my family in passing. I thought nothing of it.

My fourteen-year-old erupted in outrage. “Did he own slaves?” she demanded to know. I answered, yes, and he won the American Revolution. “He can’t be on our walls,” she declared with the perspective of a teenager.

Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: The Turning Point of Self-Loathing”

College Football Previews, Week 2, Guest Starring Joey Longley ’19 and Eric Herst ’19

Out with the neutral sites, in with the home-and-homes and conference schedules. Last week went largely according to expectations – for all of the excitement about Florida State against Alabama, it turned out to be a grind to an Alabama victory. Other games, however, were far more exciting, particularly Texas A&M losing to UCLA after giving up a 34 point lead, and Tennessee beating Georgia Tech in triple overtime.

Most notable when looking at this Saturday is the upset potential. Last week saw only a handful of upsets among major programs, with the most significant perhaps being Maryland beating Texas (Cal over North Carolina, and South Carolina over NC State being the other two among power conferences). However, the games this week are between teams much more highly ranked, and much more closely ranked. One bad turnover, or one blocked kick, could be all it takes for any of the favorites to fall.

Continue reading “College Football Previews, Week 2, Guest Starring Joey Longley ’19 and Eric Herst ’19”

NFL Regular Season Week 1: Games to Watch For

The wait is over. After months of trade rumors, mock drafts and off-the-field theatrics, the 2017 NFL season kicks off this Thursday.

Here are the games I’ll be watching this week:

  1. Chiefs at Patriots, Thursday, September 7th at 8:30 PM on NBC

The Kickoff Game of the 2017 season promises to be a good one. These two teams are in the playoff hunt again, and yet, both have serious questions to answer on Thursday. For the Patriots, who will replace Julian Edelman and LeGarrette Blount? For the Chiefs, how will rookie Kareem Hunt hold up in his first start at running back? The outcome of this game will depend on how each team rises to face their challenges. As an added bonus, on Thursday, the NFL is hosting a special noontime concert (with rumored guest Bon Jovi) at Christopher Columbus Park in Boston to celebrate the start of the 2017 season.

Continue reading “NFL Regular Season Week 1: Games to Watch For”

Class of 2020, Welcome to HLS!

Dear 1Ls,

Welcome to Harvard Law School! You are about to begin your legal career in the most momentous era of recent memory.

As a lawyer and a law student, you will have the opportunity to make a real difference in people’s lives. Whether in courts of law, in the halls of legislation, or in the public discourse, lawyers have changed and will change the course of history. Your path now joins that of so many others before you who have helped make our society what it is.

The links below contain pieces to help you navigate those difficulties and make the most of your 1L year. They contain a variety of viewpoints from a variety of people. Some of the advice here may be even be contradictory.

Nevertheless, we hope and think that this issue will inform, comfort, and maybe even inspire you. Know that you, your voice, and your actions can and will make a difference.

Again, welcome to HLS. We are so excited to have each of you join our readership and the legal community.

Sincerely,
Jim An, editor-in-chief

P.S. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @hlrecord to keep up with our latest stories and HLS news.

How to Make Professors Happy, Says a Professor by D. James Greiner, professor of law
Nervous 1Ls at Harvard Law School Should Open Up by Hector Grajeda ’18, vice president of communciations of La Alianza
Lean Into That Sense of Discomfort by Ariel Stone ’19 and Kamala Buchanan ’19, social chairs of Lambda
Making Time for What’s Important by Peter Im ’18 and Liz Gyori ’19, co-presidents of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association
Speak Now by Jim An ’18, editor-in-chief of The Record
Resist the Cult of Smart, Embrace the Call to Citizenship by Pete Davis ’18, online editor of The Record
Embrace Your Weirdness by Leilani Doktor ’19, president of the Native American Law Students Association
The Top 5 Pieces of Advice for 1Ls by Aya Gruber ’97, visiting professor
Five First-Year Survival Tips by Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, visiting professor
Be Yourself – It’s What Got You Here by Briana Williams ’18, communications director of the Black Law Students Association
Navigating the Gothic Castle of 1L by Jennifer Reynolds ’07, visiting professor
1Ls, Prioritize Mental Health by Ariella Michal Medows, health and educational consultant
Keeping the Real World in Mind by Kate Thoreson ’19, deputy editor-in-chief of The Record
Welcome Jewish Students! by Gideon Palte ’18 and Benjamin Helfgott ’19, president and community engagement chair of the Jewish Law Students Association
Take Work Seriously, Not Yourself by Sarah Catalano ’19, vice president for membership of the Federalist Society
Remember Your Values at HLS by Lauren Stanley ’18, president of the American Constitution Society
Be Yourself and Find Your Voice by Dalia Deak ’19 and Niku Jafarnia ’19, co-presidents of the Middle Eastern Law Students Association
Remember Your Hobbies by Mary Goetz ’19, co-president of the Chamber Music Society
Female Leadership Matters by Isabel Finley ’19, vice president of the Women’s Law Association

 

Female Leadership Matters

On behalf of the Women’s Law Association, welcome to HLS! I am one of the Vice Presidents of the WLA, which is one of the largest student organizations on campus. Our 22 committees encompass everything from promoting professional development by connecting members with alumnae, to conducting research on the status of gender equity at HLS, to building community through social events. Our mission statement defines the WLA as “a diverse, non-partisan, feminist organization committed to building a vibrant and supportive community for women during their time at Harvard Law School and beyond.” Accordingly, we “advocate for gender equity and bolster women in pursuit of their professional and personal goals. We empower our members with academic resources, mentorship, and professional development opportunities while providing members and alumnae with a lasting community.”

Continue reading “Female Leadership Matters”