Why Fighting for Justice Means Fighting for Professor Mark Wu’s Tenure

There is no doubt in my mind that anybody reading these words is keenly aware that Harvard Law School can be an alienating place. We need look no further than to popular culture to remember that this institution has been plagued by a history of promoting and fostering a toxic environment of cutthroat competition and destructive impulses. Recent events in national news should prompt each one of us to reflect more deeply on the just exercise of power and how to wrest it from those who abuse it.

I’ve observed Professor Mark Wu quite closely during my time as a student. Professor Wu embodies the qualities needed to elevate the standard for leadership necessary to effect positive change at this institution. HLS desperately needs faculty and administrators like Professor Wu—people who work to normalize a model of compassionate leadership to shape future leaders who will graduate from this institution and exert their influence in their respective sectors—as jurists, practitioners, and adherents to the rule of law.

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The Massachusetts Legislature Should Pass Automatic Voter Registration Now

Imagine that registering to vote were actually easy. Imagine that you did not have to navigate an antiquated signup process, remember to update your registration every time you moved, or navigate arbitrary registration deadlines just to exercise a constitutional right. Imagine that you could just show up to your polling place on Election Day and vote.

You might not have to imagine much longer: the Massachusetts legislature could make simpler voting a reality by passing the Automatic Voter Registration (“AVR”) bills currently before both chambers. The state legislature should do so before the committee reporting deadline on February 7th. AVR would not only reduce the headache of registering to vote – it would also add 700,000 people to the voter rolls in Massachusetts alone, and increase voter turnout and the diversity of the electorate in the process.

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Student Government President Adrian Perkins Resigns to Focus on Home

Student Government President Adrian Perkins resigned on February 1, 2018. His resignation letter is below. Effective today, Amanda Lee is the Student Government President and Amanda Chan is the Student Government Vice President.

I am resigning as Student Government President to prepare to run for local office in my hometown of Shreveport, Louisiana. I never expected to write those words, and it is disappointing to acknowledge that I’ll fall three months shy of my obligation to the students that voted for me. Luckily, the Student Government is in great hands; I am confident the incoming President Amanda Lee will build on the progress we’ve made since last April. The future in Shreveport is not so promising, which has spurred me to answer to another commitment that I made: to do all that I can for the community that raised me.

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APALSA to Hold Trial Reenactment February 3rd

Who counts as real Americans? What does it mean to be patriotic? This weekend, as part of its annual law and policy conference, the Harvard Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA) invites you to reflect upon these questions through the perspective of Americans of Japanese descent in 1944. Drafted to serve in the Second World War even though their families continued to be imprisoned in the harsh, unforgiving concentration camps of the inland West, should these Americans prove their loyalty to the United States by agreeing to join the Armed Forces, or should they resist the draft and challenge the constitutionality of the government’s actions?

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Walking Out on the Mooch

I’ve had the good fortune of taking the Trial Advocacy Workshop (TAW)  over Jterm. Workshop activities occur in the afternoon. After that, we have dinner with visiting faculty (judges and trial lawyers from around the country). We end the day with an evening trial demonstration put on by visiting faculty.

On Wednesday evening of the final week of class, I trudged through the tunnels from Wasserstein (where we have dinner) to the Ames Courtroom (where evening demonstrations occur). I noticed a man at the front of the room in the “jury” seating whom I hadn’t seen before. He looked out of place because he clearly wasn’t a student, but he was dressed very casually. (The TAW faculty wear business attire.)

Professor Sullivan began the evening’s proceedings, as he had on some other occasions, by talking about various opportunities the workshop can lead to and the varied career paths that TAW graduates go on to have. He made a joke about this including a very brief stint as White House Communications Director. I was confused for a few seconds and then put things together. That out of place man was Anthony Scaramucci. And Anthony Scaramucci was a graduate of TAW.

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Can Environmentalists Eat Meat?

Among the many internecine conflicts within the environmental community, one that seems particularly relevant as we struggle with our 2018 New Year’s resolutions is whether someone can be a card-carrying environmentalist while continuing to consume meat and other animal products.

Besides arguing against meat consumption from the premise that animals have an inherent right to life, one of the main arguments environmentalists put forth against meat consumption focuses on its connection to climate change. According to this argument, methane emissions involved in meat production are one of the biggest contributions to GHG emissions. If you seriously care about stopping climate change, then you should exercise responsible consumption and stop eating meat. In terms of gratuitous consumption, eating a filet mignon for dinner is equivalent to driving a Hummer to work, and no real environmentalist would do that.

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Meet the Real-Life Justice League

The real-life Justice League. From left to right: Richard Painter, The Honorable Justice Robert Katzmann, Douglas Elmendorf, Lesley Rosenthal, Juan Carlos Botero, and David McCraw.

Move over, Batman. Statman has arrived—and not a moment too soon.

What do Aquaman, Batman, Cyborg, the Flash, Superman, and Wonder Woman all have in common? None can save the world alone. Turns out, the same is true for the rule of law.

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Take the Power Back: Samantha Power Has No Place at HLS

This past April, Samantha Power ’99, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations during the latter part of President Obama’s tenure, was named to a joint appointment at both the Law School and the Kennedy School. The article from Harvard announcing her appointment cites her work in human rights, diplomacy, and international justice as qualifications for the appointment[1], but a critical examination of her record as ambassador reveals a much more sordid history of promoting American imperialism and enabling the very human rights abuses she sought out to prevent.

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Denise Ghartey Elected HLAB President

Denise Ghartey ’19 has been elected President of the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau for 2018.

“We are excited to continue the work of this year’s board and to support the HLAB mission, which aims to promote racial justice and disrupt racial and socio-economic inequalities,” said Ghartey. “We will also increase our engagement with the Cambridge and Greater Boston Area community through community partnerships and radical political lawyering.”

HLAB’s outgoing President, Julian SpearChief-Morris ’18, is “thrilled” that Ghartey will serve as his replacement.

“[Ghartley] is a strong leader, she has an infectious personality, and she knows how to make those around her feel welcome and included,” he said. “She has a great understanding of the community in which the Bureau operates, and a unique insight into how the Bureau can be made more accessible to the people which it serves.”

Big Law Harms Society

The purpose of this article is to introduce a new perspective around the discussion about career choices at HLS. Some argue that the school should become more civic-minded and encourage people to go into public service. Others argue that working for a Big Law firm is socially beneficial. Notably missing from this discussion is the idea that working for Big Law harms society.

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A Christmas Prince: Netflix’s Holiday Legal Drama for the Ages

The Empire State Building. Rockefeller Center. Central Park. The Statue of Liberty. The Christopher St. stop on the Seventh Avenue Line.

And for the final establishing shot … the Chicago River.

What was A Christmas Prince director Alex Zamm or film editor Marshall Harvey thinking? Have they never been to New York? Or Chicago?

The Record apologizes for being late to the A Christmas Prince party, but unlike Netflix’s foray into Christmas movies, at least we’re not lost.

It’s hard to say whether anyone should watch this movie. On the one hand, it’s not a very good movie. On the other hand, it’s decently entertaining. Rose McIver, who plays heroine Amber Moore,[1] somehow makes Amber seem reasonably believable despite the absolutely absurd premise of the movie.

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