An Interview with Dean Manning

On July 1, Professor John Manning ‘85 was appointed the 13th Dean of Harvard Law School. The Record sat down with him for a conversation over the summer. Read on for his thoughts.

This interview has been condensed and edited for length and clarity.

The Record: I want to start out with the hard-hitting, big picture questions. What will be the effect on your teaching load this year?

Dean Manning: I plan on continuing teaching the Public Law Workshop with Professor Daphna Renan. We’ve got a great lineup of speakers. For my spring Legislation and Regulation class, Professor Jacob Gersen has kindly agreed to step in and teach that. In the first year on a new job, I want to focus on learning how to do the best job I can do. We’ll go from there and we’ll see what kind of teaching I can do in the years out.

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Perkins, Lee Elected 2017-18 Student Government President, VP

With 36.8% of the vote, 2Ls Adrian Perkins and Amanda Lee have been elected 2017-18 HLS Student Government President and Vice President, respectively. Downballot, 1L Paola Eisner was elected as the next Director of Student Organizations, and students overwhelmingly approved a referendum to create a new crest for HLS.

“We appreciate the support and confidence of the student body,” Perkins said.

“We look forward to working with everyone and bringing student voices to the table,” Lee said.

The two races for elected office were close, with Perkins and Lee winning by 2.5 percentage points over 2Ls Anika Khan and Tyra Walker. 2Ls Joe Sullivan and Jin Kim received 28.9% of the vote. In the Director of Student Organizations race, Eisner prevailed with a 1.2 percentage point margin over 2L Lane Kauder.

The races for 2L and 3L Representatives were uncontested. The 2017-18 2L Representatives will be Leilani Doktor, Kaitlyn Beck, and Sam Garcia. The 2017-18 3L Representatives will be Raj Salhotra and Cameron Pritchett.

 

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

Adrian Perkins and Amanda Lee, Candidates for Student Government President and Vice President

Record: Why are you guys running?

Adrian Perkins: I’ve always felt like Student Government was in a unique position to change things for the better. Academic institutions come with stressors and this is an opportunity to for us relieve those stressors and to make the community better. Since joining Student Government, I’ve worked on everything from the [Student Government] constitutional working group, to changing the printing, to appointing the committee that decided to change the crest, to getting the MPRE administered at HLS. I’ve had the opportunity to see things through and make student life better here.

Amanda Lee: The HLS community matters. We spend 3 years of our lives here. I’ve seen intimately the needs of a thriving student organization that’s put so much work and care into making the school an amazing place. Adrian and I work really well together because we have a wide breadth of experience. We’ve spent the last two years building relationships, and so we’re really excited to bring others to the table and let students have that voice through student government.

Continue reading “Adrian Perkins and Amanda Lee, Candidates for Student Government President and Vice President”

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

Joe Sullivan & Jin Kim, Candidates for Student Government President and Vice President

Record: In a few words, how would you sum up your platform?

Joe Sullivan: We are demanding that the administration release the budget data so we can take a hard look at that budget so we can see what we can cut back and where we can move funding into.

Record: It seems like you guys are running as a one-issue ticket. Would you say that’s accurate?

JS: I would say generally, yes, although that one issue encompasses a lot of the issues at Harvard Law School. When we think about a lot of the issues at Harvard Law School, it’s often about how much does that cost? I think if we don’t know that it’s hard to tackle those issues, so I think of this as a more encompassing platform.

Jin Kim: It is a single-issue platform in the way that we want to get access to the budget data, and look through it, identify unnecessary costs and reallocate that to benefits that students actually want. The word benefits encompasses a lot of things, such as financial aid or mental health services. I know the impediments that a lot of students and I faced when looking to get mental health services. Continue reading “Joe Sullivan & Jin Kim, Candidates for Student Government President and Vice President”

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

Anika Khan & Tyra Walker, Candidates for Student Government President & Vice President

Record: Why are you guys running?

Anika Khan: Tyra and I are looking to redefine student government and give students the chance to redefine student government for themselves. Tyra and I know what it’s like to be a part of the existing government, and we know how to change it to help create real community here at HLS.

Tyra Walker: After thinking about how much impact we’d be able to make at this institution in the areas we care about, we really thought our experience and our skills would make us a great team for this role. Continue reading “Anika Khan & Tyra Walker, Candidates for Student Government President & Vice President”

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

Outgoing Student Government President Monea Looks Back

Nino Monea is the outgoing Student Government President. The Record asked him what was on his mind.

Record: What are some of the things that student government has been able to do this year that you’re proud of?

Monea: As far as membership goes, a majority of the executive team and elected members are women, and a majority are people of color for the first time as far back as we have records on this point, and I think it’s great that we have a team that really reflects the school that we’re supposed to represent. On substantive accomplishments, we’ve been able to implement a new printing system, which historically was students’ number one complaint in polls. 

We’ve been able to make progress on policies to help students be more politically engaged, such as recording classes on Election Day, and we’ve begun discussions about canceling courses on Election Day so students can more easily go out and vote or volunteer. And we’re for the first time trying to expand offerings for students trying to go into public [office], such as a reading group on how to run for office as a lawyer. And going forward we want to see if there’s resources this school can offer to help people who don’t come from politically connected families run for office.

And we can just go down the list of things we’ve gotten done such as online syllabi for classes, more wheelchair accessibility for printers, and peer housing for Admitted Students Weekend. So I’m really proud of all the stuff we’ve gotten done so far. Continue reading “Outgoing Student Government President Monea Looks Back”

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

2017 Student Government Elections: Director of Student Organizations

Paola Eisner

The Record: Why are you running for Director of Student Organizations?

Paola Eisner: One of the most important roles of Student Government is to bring people together and talk about what’s important to the student body, and student orgs are a big part of that. I’m excited about the opportunity to promote communication between our student orgs.

Record: What distinguishes you as a candidate?

PE: I have experience working with Student Government as a 1L Representative for Section 4, and that’s given me an inside look on how Student Government runs, how it can improve, and different methods that work and don’t work with the administration. Continue reading “2017 Student Government Elections: Director of Student Organizations”

Kate Thoreson is a 1L and a copy editor for The Harvard Law Record.

2017 Student Government Elections: 2L Rep Candidates

Interview with Leilani Doktor

The Record: Why are you running for 2L Rep?

Leilani Doktor: I believe that I give a diverse perspective to student government that is necessary just to be fully representative of our 2L class.

Record: What distinguishes you from the other candidates?

LD: I think that my unique background and public interest focus contribute to my ability to be a good representative. I was very active in student government throughout undergraduate and high school, so I’m very experienced in terms of governance regarding student bodies and creating policies that work for students. As a 1L rep, I’ve been able to make small changes, like getting refills on the free coffee downstairs in the morning and regularly meeting with the dining hall to get new dining options, including the poké bowls in the boxes that you’ve seen added to the Hark menu. Continue reading “2017 Student Government Elections: 2L Rep Candidates”

Kate Thoreson is a 1L and a copy editor for The Harvard Law Record.

2017 Student Government Elections: 3L Rep Candidates

Raj Salhotra 

Record: Why are you running for 3L rep?

Raj Salhotra: I had a great year this year. I got to head up the academic affairs committee, and there I got to organize professor lunches, make some progress with registration, and start to do some work on advising. That’s what inspired me to run again, to see if we can keep moving the ball on that. Also, five of the students that I used to teach [as a high school teacher] came in to sit in on classes. They loved it, and it reminded me that we gotta do more for low-income and first-generation students on campus. Supero’s taken a great lead on that, and I want to be a part of that. Continue reading “2017 Student Government Elections: 3L Rep Candidates”

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

“Jane Roe” Passes at 69

Norma McCorvey, known as the “Jane Roe” of Roe v. Wade, died of heart failure on February 18. She was 69 years old. As the centerpiece of one of America’s most controversial court cases, securing the right for women to have an abortion, she herself turned away from it, converting to Roman Catholicism and anti-abortion activist.

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Andrew Langen is a Record staff writer. He is a 1L.

Students Take to Streets in Anti-Trump Protests

Starting with the Women’s March on January 21, scores of Harvard Law students joined hundreds of thousands of demonstrators marching in Boston and around the country for left-leaning causes in the wake of Donald Trump’s inauguration.

In the weeks following the Women’s March, HLS students joined several other demonstrations in the Boston area, including a demonstration for the release of detainees at Logan International Airport on January 28 and a protest against President Trump’s anti-immigration executive orders in Copley Square on January 29.

Continue reading “Students Take to Streets in Anti-Trump Protests”

Kate Thoreson is a 1L and a copy editor for The Harvard Law Record.

Chin Murder Trials Reenactors Seek to Start Dialogue

On June 23, 1982, Vincent Chin was brutally beaten by Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz with a baseball bat. Four days later, his head cracked open from the assault, Chin died. For their crime, the state of Michigan sentenced Ebens and Nitz to three years’ probation and a $3000 file. The sentencing judge said that “these weren’t the kind of men you send to jail.” A federal prosecution had no more success against the two men.

This Saturday, February 4, students, faculty, and a federal judge will be reenacting the trials for an open audience.

The free reenactment starts at 4 p.m. in Milstein East in Wasserstein Hall. Professors Michael Klarman and Mark Wu, Judge Denny Chin of the United States Second Circuit Court of Appeals, Dean of Students Marcia Sells, and over a dozen students will perform roles of the lawyers, judges, and other individuals in the trials.

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Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

An Exit Interview with Dean Minow

After eight years as the head of Harvard Law School, Dean Martha Minow is stepping down from her role to return to teaching and research at the Law School. Her resignation is effective as of this July. The Record talked to Dean Minow about her thoughts looking back and looking forward. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and organization.

The Record: What made you decide to step down as dean?

Dean Minow: I made the decision just before the holidays. I want to participate in the events of the day. And I’m late in a contract for a book. So I’m looking forward to working on all of that.

Continue reading “An Exit Interview with Dean Minow”

Jim An is the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Law Record and a member of the Harvard Law School Class of 2018.

Professor Nesson Urges Civic Engagement on Question 4

If you ask a Harvard Law Student who Charles Nesson is, they might say “one of the founders of the Berkman Center.” They are far more likely, however, to respond, “he’s that one professor who smokes a lot of weed, right?”

Charles Nesson is known for his eccentricities and eclectic tastes. Having the fortune of interviewing him this past week, I received confirmation of this perception. Dressed in an outfit that I would label “minimalist-urban-chill,” Professor Nesson entered his office accompanied by his tiny, eight-year-old Yorkshire terrier, Sweet Pea. His face exuded wisdom and calm. And while I wanted to ask him about everything from his favorite film to where he gets his marijuana from, I reminded myself that the purpose of the interview was to understand the context of Massachusetts’s ballot measure: Question 4. The measure, which was recently endorsed by The Boston Globe, would legalize commercial and recreational use of marijuana by adults over the age of 21 and would create a commission to regulate its use. Individuals would each be able to grow up to six marijuana plants in their homes. The measure is predicted to pass in tomorrow’s election, although insiders warn that it will be a tighter vote than expected.[1]

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An Interview with Dean Minow

Two weeks ago, The Record interviewed Dean Martha Minow for her thoughts on the Law School, women in the profession, and the Cubs. We were initially informed by the communications office that they objected to our publication of the interview, and we met with them and Dean of Students Marcia Sells last week to discuss the issue. Following that meeting, the communications office withdrew their objections. We are pleased to present our interview with Dean Minow, condensed and edited for clarity.

The Record: This is the first year in Harvard Law School’s history in which the entering JD class was more than 50% women. How did that end up happening and what do you make of it?

Dean Minow: We’ve made a lot of outreach efforts, and I’m happy with the results. These things do change from year to year though: last year’s LLM class was majority women, but this year it’s majority men.

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