Dean Manning Unresponsive and Deceptive in Crucial Debate Over the Law School’s Mission

Despite pitching “vigorous, lively discussion” at Harvard Law as his top priority, Dean Manning has repeatedly refused to engage with the ongoing debate over Harvard Law’s contribution to what some alumni are calling “the crisis of legal inequality.”

Last year, the Harvard Law Record’s Pete Davis published a book-length report entitled Our Bicentennial Crisis: A Call to Action for Harvard Law’s Public Interest Mission, which documented Harvard’s failure to address the mass exclusion from legal power for the average American in the criminal justice, civil justice and political systems. The report included several reform proposals through which HLS could potentially remedy its role in this legal crisis.

Continue reading “Dean Manning Unresponsive and Deceptive in Crucial Debate Over the Law School’s Mission”

Harvard’s Contracts Courses Ignore the Most Important Parts Of Contract Law Today: The End of Freedom of Contract and the Erosion of Tort Law

Our contracts courses are based on mythology. The Book Of Genesis for contracts goes a little something like this: 

“In the beginning, humans made deals with one another. When there is a true ‘meeting of the minds,’ humans shake hands, and the courts enforce that as a binding contract. Contracts make both parties better off by allocating goods efficiently between the two parties, thereby creating value. If John has 5 bushels of wheat, and Jane has 5 gallons of milk, each has too much wheat  or milk to consume by themselves, respectively. John contracts for some of Jane’s milk, Jane contracts for some of John’s wheat, and thereby the excess of wheat and milk is no longer excess, by utilized to its fullest extent. Voila, value is created.”

It’s a nice story. Unfortunately, this mythology little resembles contracts today. The overwhelming majority of today’s contracting looks a bit different: Continue reading “Harvard’s Contracts Courses Ignore the Most Important Parts Of Contract Law Today: The End of Freedom of Contract and the Erosion of Tort Law”

Our Professors Shouldn’t Engage In McCarthyism

Professor Cass Sunstein engaged in a blatant display of McCarthyism in his op-ed for Bloomberg View this week, in which he accused politicians to both the left and the right of him of Marxism.

Both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are using Marxist strategies, he argued, because their rhetoric “heightens the contradictions,” a quote directly from (dun dun dun) MARX!

Of course, when Marx talked about “heightening the contradictions” he meant that the contradictions inherent in capitalism must worsen in order to provoke the working class to rise up in revolt. In his view, small reforms that blunt the edge of capitalism would only prolong its existence. Continue reading “Our Professors Shouldn’t Engage In McCarthyism”