Class of 2021, Welcome to HLS!

Dear 1Ls,

Welcome to Harvard Law School! It couldn’t be a more exciting time for you to start your legal career.

Your life from here on out will be different, and you will make a difference, whether you choose to do so through private practice, government, public interest advocacy, or anything else. This place will open doors for you, and once you get inside, you’ll have the opportunity to make an impact.

This issue of The Record is especially for you. It contains a variety of viewpoints from a variety of people on how to take advantage of your time here. Of course, some of the advice contradicts itself. Use the judgment that led you here.

The staff of The Record hopes that you will gain something from what we’ve put together: hope, inspiration, or even a sense of calm. We encourage you to honor your voice and your moral compass during your time here, because what you say and what you do matters to the legal world.

Again, welcome to HLS. We are so excited to have each of you join our readership and the legal community.

Sincerely,
Kate Thoreson, editor-in-chief

P.S. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @hlrecord to keep up with our latest stories and HLS news.

An Open Letter to the Class of 2021: On Mental Health by Viviana Hanley ’20, Student Mental Health Association Advocacy Committee member
Take Advantage of Opportunities to Learn at HLS by Larry Tribe ’66, professor
An Interview with I. Glenn Cohen ’03 by Kate Thoreson ’19, Record editor-in-chief
Being Queer at HLS Means Standing Up by Laura Older ’20 & Heather Pickerell ’20, Lamba co-presidents
Seek Affinity and Challenge Community by Ariel Ashtamker ’19, Josh Mathew ’19, Laya Maheshwari ’20, Radhe Patel ’20, Rajiv Narayan ’20, and Sabrina Singh ’20, SALSA members
Now That I’ve Got Your Attention, Here’s a Listicle! by Kate Thoreson ’19, Record editor-in-chief
Grab the Opportunity to Build a Better HLS by Leilani Doktor ’19, HLS Student Government co-president
The Quest for Worldliness by Daniel B. Rodriguez ’87, visiting professor
You Belong at HLS by Lauren Williams ’19, BLSA president
Remember Who You Are… and Where You Are by Zach Sosa ’19, HLAB communications director
Find Your Passions at HLS by Chloe Hawker ’19, BSA member
Make the Most of Your Time by Jessica Zhang ’19, Harvard Law Review member
Support Each Other at HLS and Beyond by Isabel Finley ’19 and Regina Powers ’19, WLA president and committee chair
Be Kind to Yourself and Others by Pantea Faed ’20 and Taha Wiheba ’20, MELSA co-presidents
Remember How to Be a Good Friend by Laurel Fresquez ’19 and Chloe Hawker ’19, Parody producer and writer
Challenge Yourself in Healthy Ways at HLS by Douglas Colby ’20, FedSoc vice president
Enjoy Yourself at HLS by Radhe Patel ’20, ACS vice president

From the Archives: Future Justice Breyer proposes income-based deferred tuition to increase public interest participation

This year, students debated different paths forward to increase public interest participation, including reforms to the Low Income Protection Program. As this 1977 Record archive article on future Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer’s proposal for income-based deferred tuition shows, this debate has been happening for a while.

“Pay Later” Schemes Debated

by Terry Keeney

April 15, 1977

The Law School faculty is currently considering proposals to allow students to defer paying tuition bills until after graduation.

The proposals, discussed at the March 30 faculty meeting, are far from the implementation stage. But if the Law School adopts some form of tuition deferral, students in the future may choose to obtain loans for all or part of their educational expenses. Then they would not be required to repay their loan obligations until as late as five or ten years after
graduation, when the rate of repayment would be determined by their income level.

Proponents of the plan argue that tuition deferral would accomplish two purposes. First, it would further shift the burden of financing the student’s legal education from the parents’ current income to the student’s future income. Second, it would remove the pressure on students to take high-paying jobs to repay educational debts and, some proponents hope, encourage more students to enter the less lucrative public-interest career. Continue reading “From the Archives: Future Justice Breyer proposes income-based deferred tuition to increase public interest participation”

Open Letter From Alumni to Dean Manning: Respond to Our Bicentennial Crisis

On April 23, 2018, seven prominent alumni sent an open letter to Dean Manning requesting a public response to and public hearing on Our Bicentennial Crisis, the Record report on Harvard Law’s public interest mission. The letter is copied below:

Dear Dean Manning,

Last October, during the two hundredth anniversary of Harvard Law School, Pete Davis (3L) and his colleagues issued a report titled, Our Bicentennial Crisis: A Call to Action for Harvard Law School’s Public Interest Mission. Its contents were of considerable interest to more than a few students, faculty, and deans from other law schools. As you know, on February 7, 2018, four faculty members met with a sizable number of students for an evening discussion. In addition, The Harvard Law Record has devoted considerable space to the report and the reactions to its recommendations and analyses. Continue reading “Open Letter From Alumni to Dean Manning: Respond to Our Bicentennial Crisis”

Meet the Candidates for Student Government, 2018-2019

We conducted interviews with candidates who will be up for positions in Student Government. Voting will take place on April 4 and 5. For every vote counted in the election, Leilani Doktor and Jonathan Herzog have committed one minute of their time to volunteering at polling locations during the 2018 midterm elections.

Here is where to find these interviews:

Leilani Doktor and Jonathan Herzog: Candidates for Co-Presidents
Princess Daisy Akita: Candidate for Director of Student Organizations
Hannah Dawson, Daniel Egel-Weiss, and Radhe Patel: Candidates for 2L Representative
Pamela Gaulin and Jared Lax: Candidates for 3L Representative

At the Harvard Law Forum: A roundtable discussion on Our Bicentennial Crisis

On February 7, The Harvard Law Forum hosted a roundtable on The Record‘s recent book, Our Bicentennial Crisis: A Call to Action for Harvard Law School’s Public Interest Mission.

Professors Randall Kennedy, Duncan Kennedy, Carol Steiker and Todd Rakoff joined the author, Pete Davis ’18, in a roundtable discussion.

A video of Pete’s opening remarks are here:

And the full event video is here:

The full text of the Our Bicentennial Crisis report is here.

Open Letter: We Condemn President Trump’s Incitement of Violence

To our students and the wider HLS community,

We write to condemn a series of acts by President Trump that incite violence and are inconsistent with a democratic legal order.  On November 29th, the President circulated unverified videos that explicitly vilified members of a religious community as dangerous.  In his tweet, the videos appeared without any comment, context, or explanation, as if the fact that they concerned “Muslim” actors itself established their relevance.   In that way, the videos justified hostility towards individuals on the ground of their faith alone.  The President’s message further endorsed violence insofar as it expressly retweeted, thus apparently approving, a source convicted of religiously aggravated harassment.

Continue reading “Open Letter: We Condemn President Trump’s Incitement of Violence”

Title IX: An Investigation

The Record serves the community in part through investigating the goings-on at Harvard Law School. As part of the #MeToo movement, we are soliciting stories, information, and anything else pertaining to Title IX proceedings on campus. If you would like to share any of those things with us, don’t hesitate to send us an e-mail. The law school community benefits from the truth, and that is why we still print.

Name:

Email:

Title:

Letter to the Editor:

Record Retrospective: #SaveNelly

A year ago, our editor-in-chief and another 2L advocated on the behalf of Nelly, a recording artist who at the time owed the IRS and the state of Missouri millions of dollars.

#SaveNelly by Jim An ’18

Despite the fact that Nelly was one of the best-selling artists of the 2000s, he apparently owes the IRS a $2.4 million tax bill and may be having trouble paying it off. Based on the figures for royalties per stream, some websites have estimated that Nelly needs somewhere between 287 to 400 million streams to pay off his debts. However, as any tax student knows, Nelly will owe more taxes on these royalties, so he’d actually need as many as 660 million streams in order to pay off his debts. Anyway, if you’re in the mood to help Nelly out, here are the ten best Nelly songs to stream.

Continue reading “Record Retrospective: #SaveNelly”

Letter to the Editor: The Turning Point of Self-Loathing

I am a second cousin, seven times removed, of President George Washington. And I am African-American.

While traveling to Charlottesville on July 26, 2017, I saw a portrait of General Washington kneeling in prayer at Valley Forge. The image stayed with me as an expression of faith in the Valley of the Shadow of Death. I made a mental note to purchase the portrait for Christmas.

When I returned home to San Diego, I shared my idea with my family in passing. I thought nothing of it.

My fourteen-year-old erupted in outrage. “Did he own slaves?” she demanded to know. I answered, yes, and he won the American Revolution. “He can’t be on our walls,” she declared with the perspective of a teenager.

Continue reading “Letter to the Editor: The Turning Point of Self-Loathing”

Class of 2020, Welcome to HLS!

Dear 1Ls,

Welcome to Harvard Law School! You are about to begin your legal career in the most momentous era of recent memory.

As a lawyer and a law student, you will have the opportunity to make a real difference in people’s lives. Whether in courts of law, in the halls of legislation, or in the public discourse, lawyers have changed and will change the course of history. Your path now joins that of so many others before you who have helped make our society what it is.

The links below contain pieces to help you navigate those difficulties and make the most of your 1L year. They contain a variety of viewpoints from a variety of people. Some of the advice here may be even be contradictory.

Nevertheless, we hope and think that this issue will inform, comfort, and maybe even inspire you. Know that you, your voice, and your actions can and will make a difference.

Again, welcome to HLS. We are so excited to have each of you join our readership and the legal community.

Sincerely,
Jim An, editor-in-chief

P.S. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @hlrecord to keep up with our latest stories and HLS news.

How to Make Professors Happy, Says a Professor by D. James Greiner, professor of law
Nervous 1Ls at Harvard Law School Should Open Up by Hector Grajeda ’18, vice president of communciations of La Alianza
Lean Into That Sense of Discomfort by Ariel Stone ’19 and Kamala Buchanan ’19, social chairs of Lambda
Making Time for What’s Important by Peter Im ’18 and Liz Gyori ’19, co-presidents of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association
Speak Now by Jim An ’18, editor-in-chief of The Record
Resist the Cult of Smart, Embrace the Call to Citizenship by Pete Davis ’18, online editor of The Record
Embrace Your Weirdness by Leilani Doktor ’19, president of the Native American Law Students Association
The Top 5 Pieces of Advice for 1Ls by Aya Gruber ’97, visiting professor
Five First-Year Survival Tips by Elizabeth Chamblee Burch, visiting professor
Be Yourself – It’s What Got You Here by Briana Williams ’18, communications director of the Black Law Students Association
Navigating the Gothic Castle of 1L by Jennifer Reynolds ’07, visiting professor
1Ls, Prioritize Mental Health by Ariella Michal Medows, health and educational consultant
Keeping the Real World in Mind by Kate Thoreson ’19, deputy editor-in-chief of The Record
Welcome Jewish Students! by Gideon Palte ’18 and Benjamin Helfgott ’19, president and community engagement chair of the Jewish Law Students Association
Take Work Seriously, Not Yourself by Sarah Catalano ’19, vice president for membership of the Federalist Society
Remember Your Values at HLS by Lauren Stanley ’18, president of the American Constitution Society
Be Yourself and Find Your Voice by Dalia Deak ’19 and Niku Jafarnia ’19, co-presidents of the Middle Eastern Law Students Association
Remember Your Hobbies by Mary Goetz ’19, co-president of the Chamber Music Society
Female Leadership Matters by Isabel Finley ’19, vice president of the Women’s Law Association

 

An Interview with Dean Manning

On July 1, Professor John Manning ‘85 was appointed the 13th Dean of Harvard Law School. The Record sat down with him for a conversation over the summer. Read on for his thoughts.

This interview has been condensed and edited for length and clarity.

The Record: I want to start out with the hard-hitting, big picture questions. What will be the effect on your teaching load this year?

Dean Manning: I plan on continuing teaching the Public Law Workshop with Professor Daphna Renan. We’ve got a great lineup of speakers. For my spring Legislation and Regulation class, Professor Jacob Gersen has kindly agreed to step in and teach that. In the first year on a new job, I want to focus on learning how to do the best job I can do. We’ll go from there and we’ll see what kind of teaching I can do in the years out.

Continue reading “An Interview with Dean Manning”

Addendum to the Report of the Harvard Law School Task Force on Academic Community and Student Engagement

As student representatives to the Harvard Law School Task Force on Academic Community and Student Engagement, we believe in the potential power of Harvard Law School. We believe this institution is uniquely situated to serve as a steward of the rule of law in a time of critical global need; as a training ground for ethical advocates for social justice and responsible corporate lawyers alike; and as an academic playground for much-needed intellectual exploration. We believe that if the institution’s unparalleled resources––human and financial––were mobilized to ensure that all stakeholders in our community are heard, Harvard Law would be better positioned to fulfill its mission to train world-class lawyers, leaders, advocates, and agents for change.

Yet, the composition of this Task Force––with representatives for students, alumni, and faculty–– seems to mirror the larger challenges facing the institution: an unfulfilled voice of all members of the community. Even in the presence of student representatives, student concerns were not heard or considered. The subjects of our critique, the methods utilized to observe issues, and the innovative and imaginative proposals offered by students were often met with platitudes. Whether about the scope of the Task Force, about our role on the Task Force, or about the hard lines delineating what we could and could never question about the structure of this institution, students on this Task Force were denied the exercise of power afforded to us by the broad mandate articulated by Dean Martha Minow. This tension highlights a broader problem on campus––the wide latitude of the HLS professorate vis-a-vis the rest of the HLS community. To this end, in our capacity as student representatives to this Task Force, we felt compelled and driven by principle to articulate the concerns of students in a manner that we think best captures the concerns of our peers.

The faculty is the gatekeeper of Harvard Law School. They are a self-governing, self-regulating body that collectively determines the direction of the institution. At present, faculty answers to no one within the law school community, whether on procedural or academic matters. Therefore, Harvard Law School, like any sizable institution, has room for improvement, but only if the institution and its gatekeepers are open to progress. If the law school is serious about making positive change, faculty must genuinely listen to the ideas, suggestions, questions, and concerns of the entire community. Harvard Law School is nothing more than a partnership between its faculty, staff, students, and alumni. Only through true and meaningful engagement with all of these essential stakeholders that make up the institution will we be able to achieve the lofty goals set out in the school’s mission statement.

The Task Force itself was never expected to solve the challenges faced by the school. Instead, we were tasked to investigate; to listen; to understand; ultimately, to suggest a way forward by way of recommendations. Although we agree with many of the recommendations in the Report, we diverge on a few critical subjects. We are of the view that the problem is not articulated well enough. Instead, the Task Force Report resorts to generalities that are devoid of the concerns we heard from students, rendering the investigation piece utterly meaningless. While the recommendations are worthwhile tweaks, they are minimal in the face of the enormous task for which we were called to probe and mend. The challenges facing this law school are endemic, and nothing short of meaningful engagement and a commitment to material change will be able to address concerns expressed by students and faculty members for decades.

Continue reading “Addendum to the Report of the Harvard Law School Task Force on Academic Community and Student Engagement”

Letter to the Editor: The Destruction of the Constitutional Right of “Freedom of Association” at Harvard University

Recently, the administration leadership at Harvard University has proposed a ban on fraternities, sororities, and “finals clubs”, as well as other organizations. The ban would apply to students who attend university at Harvard. As a graduate of Harvard Law School, I view this as misguided policy. The Constitution of the United States guarantees “freedom of association”.

In my opinion, if this ban goes into effect, members of these clubs simply have to sue Harvard University, in federal court, for violating their constitutional rights. The University will lose these lawsuits, but why make everyone go through that misery? To have a committee of administrators decide which private organizations students can belong to, and which they cannot belong to, is not only a clear violation of the student’s constitutional rights, it is overbearing, downright parental, overly paternalistic, and frightens this freedom-loving citizen.

Let the students make their own decisions, and let the students make their own mistakes. Accountability, legal and otherwise, should always be on an individual basis, not a form of collective punishment, and clearly never a form of collective banishment.

Perhaps the leadership of Harvard University could spend their time better by sitting around a bong, and smoking copious amounts of marijuana, and eating mountains of pop tarts. Then in their heads, they can dream of the dictatorship that they so clearly want to impose on the powerless students of the University. “Hey teachers, leave those kids alone!”

Sincerely,

Charles Facktor
Harvard Law School Class of 1990