Tag Archives: gender

Opinion  /  March 11, 2013  / 

Do You Accept the Status Quo? It’s About Time to Shatter the Ceiling

The Shatter the Ceiling coalition is an initiative calling attention to systemic gender disparities at Harvard Law School. Shatter the Ceiling started with a rumor: “Did you hear that not one woman got Magna Cum Laude last year?” my friend asked me over winter break. With a few minutes of research, this rumor proved untrue, but its origin was easily explainable. In 2011, approximately 30 percent of magna cum laude recipients were women. In 2012, the number remained unchanged. A little more research led me to Adam Neufeld’s 2004 Study, “Study on Women’s Experiences at Harvard Law School,” on the HLS website. Adam Neufeld had access to 1L grades, other statistics and freedom to observe classrooms. He found male students were 50 percent more likely than women to speak voluntarily at least once in class; 40 percent of men ranked themselves in the top quintile in quantitative skills versus 11 percent of women, and; from … Continue reading

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News / see also  /  February 21, 2013  / 

Law Review Adds Affirmative Action For Gender

Law Review elected a new President, Gillian S. Grossman; included gender to the list of criteria for new selected new editors; and added two more editor positions, according to the Harvard Crimson. 

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News  /  October 19, 2012  / 

Demographics of BSA, Law Review, HLAB

2012.10.19 Demographics

  According to the Board of Student Advisors, approximately 33 percent of its members self-identified as female, 33 percent self-identified as males and 33 percent did not report their gender. According to the Harvard Law Review, approximately 25 percent of its 88 members are female and 75 percent are males. According to the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, approximately 40 percent of its 51 members self-identified as female, 44 percent self-identified as male and 17 percent did not report their gender. According to the BSA, approximately 17 percent of its 42 members self-identified as non-white, 50 percent are whites and 33 percent did not report their race. Law Review did not have data on the racial composition of their current board of editors. According to HLAB, 31 percent of its 51 members self-identified as non-white, 52 percent self-identified as white and 17 percent did not report their race. According to the BSA, approximately 2 percent of its 42 … Continue reading

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News  /  July 31, 2012  / 

Law Review 25 Percent Female

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The upcoming acadmic year’s Law Review is 25 percent female, according to Law Review President Conor Tochilin, Law ’13 and Business ’13. This represents an 8 percent drop in female membership from the last academic year. “As is true every year, this year’s writing competition was extremely competitive. We are disappointed that this year’s editor selection process produced a very low number of women editors despite our robust outreach efforts last spring, and we are currently investigating why this occurred.” Tochilin said, “This year, we plan to continue our women’s outreach efforts, and we strongly encourage incoming 1L women to reach out to current Law Review editors for more information and to take the writing competition in May.” Tochilin also provided a chart containing the Law Review’s female membership since 2005.

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News  /  April 19, 2012  / 

Demographics of BSA, Law Review, HLAB

2012.4.16 Demographics

According to the Board of Student Advisors, approximately 48 percent of its 42 members self-identified as female, 43 percent self-identified as males and nine percent did not report their gender. According to the Harvard Law Review, approximately 33 percent of its 88 members are female and 67 percent are males. According to the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, approximately 40 percent of its 48 members self-identified as female, 44 percent self-identified as male and 17 percent did not report their gender. According to the BSA, approximately 14 percent of its 42 members self-identified as racial minorities, 76 percent are whites and ten percent did not report their race. Law Review did not have data on the racial composition of their current board of editors. According to HLAB, 31 percent of its 48 members self-identified as racial minorities, 52 percent self-identified as white and 17 percent did not report their race. According to the BSA, approximately five percent of its 42 members … Continue reading

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Opinion  /  March 20, 2012  / 

Transparency, Big and Small

The first semester of law school is supposed to be the hardest. Students are thrown in to sink or swim, though no one knows until late January if they’re actually drowning or if it just feels that way. But I would suggest that second semester presents its own challenges. Like a new relationship after the honeymoon phase, the rush of excitement has worn off, and each party starts to see the annoying habits of the other. Harvard Law School, I’m afraid that the glamour has worn thin. I have found myself complaining about many things, mostly petty, a few more substantive. On the former end, why did the free coffee in Lewis dry up? Why isn’t the computer lab in Wasserstein open 24 hours? Sometimes, I just don’t have time to hike over to Langdell to get something printed. On the more substantive side, why is on-campus housing so overpriced? … Continue reading

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