Demographics of BSA, Law Review, HLAB

2012.10.19 Demographics

 

According to the Board of Student Advisors, approximately 33 percent of its members self-identified as female, 33 percent self-identified as males and 33 percent did not report their gender. According to the Harvard Law Review, approximately 25 percent of its 88 members are female and 75 percent are males. According to the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, approximately 40 percent of its 51 members self-identified as female, 44 percent self-identified as male and 17 percent did not report their gender.

According to the BSA, approximately 17 percent of its 42 members self-identified as non-white, 50 percent are whites and 33 percent did not report their race. Law Review did not have data on the racial composition of their current board of editors. According to HLAB, 31 percent of its 51 members self-identified as non-white, 52 percent self-identified as white and 17 percent did not report their race.

According to the BSA, approximately 2 percent of its 42 members self-identified as Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender or Queer, 64 percent did not self-identify as LGBTQ and 33 percent did not report. Law Review did not have data on the sexual orientation of its members. According to HLAB, 2 percent of its 48 members self-identified as LGBTQ, 64 percent did not self-identify as LGBTQ and 33 percent did not report their sexual orientation.

As stated by their respective presidents, all three organizations have policies against releasing the confidential demographic data of applicants. All three organizations are composed of 2Ls and 3Ls.

“We are disappointed that this year’s Law Review has a low number of women editors and are continuing to investigate why this occurred.  In the meantime, we plan to continue our women’s outreach efforts, and we strongly encourage incoming 1L women to reach out to current Law Review editors for more information and to take the writing competition in May.” Law Review President Conor Tochilin, Law ’13 and Business ’13, said.

According to HLAB President Tim Visser, Law ’13, “HLAB believes the categories listed reflect only a fraction of what we as an organization consider to be ‘diversity.’  HLAB values diversity in all its forms — both as a worthwhile end on its own, but also because our work as a legal services organization makes a diverse membership essential to our success.”

Demographics of BSA, Law Review, HLAB

2012.4.16 Demographics

According to the Board of Student Advisors, approximately 48 percent of its 42 members self-identified as female, 43 percent self-identified as males and nine percent did not report their gender. According to the Harvard Law Review, approximately 33 percent of its 88 members are female and 67 percent are males. According to the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, approximately 40 percent of its 48 members self-identified as female, 44 percent self-identified as male and 17 percent did not report their gender.

According to the BSA, approximately 14 percent of its 42 members self-identified as racial minorities, 76 percent are whites and ten percent did not report their race. Law Review did not have data on the racial composition of their current board of editors. According to HLAB, 31 percent of its 48 members self-identified as racial minorities, 52 percent self-identified as white and 17 percent did not report their race.

According to the BSA, approximately five percent of its 42 members self-identified as Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender or Queer, 66 percent did not self-identify as LGBTQ and ten percent did not report their race. Law Review did not have data on the sexual orientation of its members. According to HLAB, 15 percent of its 48 members self-identified as LGBTQ, 69 percent did not self-identify as LGBTQ and 17 percent did not report their race.

As stated by their respective presidents, all three organizations have policies against releasing the confidential demographic data of applicants. All three organizations are composed of 2Ls and 3Ls.

According to HLAB President Tim Visser, Law ’13, “the categories listed reflect only a fraction of what we as an organization consider to be diversity.”

“Each year, the Editorial Board performs extensive outreach efforts to encourage all 1Ls to compete in the [Law Review] Competition and these efforts are continuing in earnest this year,” Law Review President Conor Tochilin, Law ’13 and Business ’13, said.

According to BSA President Jillian London, Law ’13, “The BSA is committed to representing the entire student body and can only do so by having members with a variety of backgrounds and experiences. We intend to continue in our efforts to attract a wide array of applicants next year and beyond.”

The Office of Admissions’ Class Profiles for the 2010 and 2011 entering classes indicate that 48 percent of those two classes are female and 37 percent are students of color.

London Elected President of BSA

E Board Pic

Jillian London, Law ’13, was elected President of the Board of Student Advisors. Tracy Branding, Law ’13, was elected Vice President of Management; Emma Freeman, Law ’13, was elected Vice President of the 1L Curriculum and Jeff Habenicht was elected Vice President of the Ames Competition.

BSA Executive Board (from left to right): Tracy Branding, Emma Freeman, Jillian London and Jeff Habenicht.