Category Archives: News

From the Print Edition / News  /  March 27, 2014  / 

PETA Lawyer: Making the Case Against Killer Whales in Captivity

What does it mean to be human? The classic definition states that we are the only creature with the tragic awareness of the “big picture” i.e. the ability to see the beginning and the end. This awareness of our own mortality sparks in all of us a desire to leave a lasting impact upon the planet and upon our fellow human beings. This impact can take many forms; some strive to understand the great mysteries of the universe and in so doing have given us our greatest scientific, technological and philosophic triumphs. Others seek to increase the caliber and availability of social justice for the benefit of all mankind. Classical conceptions of humanity have led us to believe that as a “higher creature” capable of infinite wisdom, tenderness, and progress we have a duty to each other to search for truth, to do justice, and to care for the uniqueness … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  March 6, 2014  / 

Harvard Law School Hosts Contentious Affirmative Action Debate

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In a debate that seemed testy at times, Harvard Law professor Randall Kennedy and three others battled it out in the Ames Courtroom last week over the motion that “affirmative action on campus does more harm than good.” Kennedy and Columbia Law professor Theodore Shaw argued against the motion, while professors Gail Heriot and Richard Sander—from USD Law and UCLA Law, respectively—argued for it. ABC News correspondent John Donvan served as moderator. Heriot’s team opposed affirmative action because they believe that it ironically does more harm than good to the very groups it is supposed to help. “Rick and I are here to make a very narrow point: race preferential admissions policies are doing far more harm than good,” said Heriot. “The very large preferences that are now routinely employed by colleges and universities produce fewer, not more, black scientists, black engineers, and black medical doctors. They produce fewer black … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  March 6, 2014  / 

Circle of Laws Review

The HLS Drama Society has reminded us just how talented our classmates are, in a light not often shone at the law school. This past weekend, students and faculty enjoyed the 64th Parody production, The Lawyer King: The Circle of Laws. In a fight to reclaim the birthright bestowed upon him by his mother, Simba, son of Dean Martha Minfasa and heir to the Harvard Law Deanship, faced a villainous Professor Alan Dershowitz. Along the way, student groups, professors, and the administration alike were subject to tasteful deprecation. The writers satirized the law school experience in a way that was both memorable and clever, and the exceptional performances of the cast and band truly brought the words to life. “The best part of the Parody is the people,” said Producer and third-year student Raul Campillo. “My highest priority is to make sure that everyone on the cast feels valued and … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  March 6, 2014  / 

Conference Preview: Disruptive Innovation in the Market for Legal Services

What do Ravel Law, Legal Hero, ViewaBill, LawyerUp, and Legal Zoom have in common? All are start-ups, founded since 2010, which hope to disrupt the market for legal services. At a conference titled, “Disruptive Innovation in the Market for Legal Services,” taking place at HLS on Thursday, March 6, various experts will discuss this disruptive trend and its likely impact on the legal profession. The conference is sponsored by Harvard Law School’s Program on the Legal Profession. David Wilkins, Lester Kissel Professor of Law and Director of Harvard Law School’s Program on the Legal Profession, said, “I think this is a critical time in the history of the legal profession, in which things are changing rapidly. The world in which today’s law students will practice is going to look very different from the world that their professors entered.” “There are three trends shaping today’s economy,” said Wilkins. “The first is … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  February 20, 2014  / 

Feminists Take On Debt

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“Who agrees that poor people make bad decisions?” Southern District of New York Judge Shelley Chapman asked to crowded room on Monday, Feb. 17. Only a couple hands expressed concurring opinions. “But everyone makes bad decisions,” Judge Chapman continued. “There is a tremendous amount of empirical data that shows if you put a non-poor person in a situation of scarcity, they will make bad decisions.” This data is especially revealing because women find themselves in more dire financial constraints more frequently and more quickly. There is also a double standard with corporate and consumer financial responsibility. Judge Chapman offered American Airlines as an example. Before declaring bankruptcy, American Airlines did not pay its creditors while it had billions sitting in the bank. Analysts considered this to be business-savvy behavior, but if a consumer did something like this it would be considered immoral. The United States was founded on debt, and … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  November 7, 2013  / 

Shake ‘em Up HLS Conference Report

Photo by Sima Atri Recently twelve speakers joined Ralph Nader for an unprecedented “Shake ‘Em Up HLS” event in Ames Courtroom. They came from diverse backgrounds, but they were united by their conviction that the American legal system is broken, and by the urgency of speaking to Harvard Law Students to stir them to do something about it. Students and faculty in attendance heard about a wide range of substantive areas of law, and a variety of ways in which legal institutions are broken. The substantive areas included tax law and its purpose (David Johnston), the cannibalization of tort law through mandatory pre-litigation arbitration (Michael Rustad), the inadequacies of America’s pension system (Karen Ferguson), the dramatic shift in the judicial system against plaintiffs and access to the courtroom (Arthur Miller), the importance of whistleblowers (Tom Devine), and the role of science in law and legal education (Sheldon Krimsky). Betsy Cavendish … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  November 7, 2013  / 

HLAB on its 100th Birthday

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Photo by Emma Raviv “I was really jaded after 1L year because it was so far removed from my kids and the issues that I heard about, so cut and dry, and it just reminded me of everything bad about an ivory tower,” Annie Lee, a former educator and current HLAB 3L student, paused momentarily. “But HLAB reminded me about why law is important and how law can be used as a tool to help people who needed it.” The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau will celebrate 100 years of providing free legal services to low-income individuals in the Greater Boston area on the weekend of November 8th, 2013. The Bureau, better known as HLAB, is the oldest student-run legal services organization and specializes in four different practice areas: housing law, family law, government benefits law, and fair wage law. As a legal service organization, HLAB members are both students and … Continue reading

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From the Print Edition / News  /  September 23, 2013  / 

Fashion Fellowship

“I didn’t have any aspirations to be Marc Jacobs,” Bridgette Hylton, ‘09, confessed while explaining how she and Joana Florez,’09, developed “ShopRaghouse,” a Kickstarter-meets-Project Runway start-up. “I just thought ‘I have some ideas for some cool dresses, how awesome would it be to have them made?’” Despite spending a wonderful year on Governor Deval Patrick’s campaign staff, and another exciting year as a junior associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore, Hylton opted to return to Boston with aspirations of starting her own fashion line – aspirations that soon became paired with frustrations. “The fashion industry is a lot different than law and government. Things don’t work on the same timeline – there really isn’t a set way to do anything and you have to kind of figure the whole thing out yourself. In the midst of trying to get my line off the ground, I called Joana and she said, … Continue reading

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News  /  July 22, 2013  / 

Archive of Volumes 1-113 of The Record Now Available

The Harvard Law School library has digitized nearly all of the first 113 volumes of the Harvard Law Record, covering the first 55 years of the paper’s existence. The issues can be viewed here. Highlights include: Ralph Nader’s 1958 article The American Automobile: Designed for Death?, which became his best-selling book Unsafe at Any Speed David F. Binder and Ralph Nader’s 1959 report on the Cuban Revolution, which included an exclusive interview with Fidel Castro Eventual Chief Justice of the Supreme Court William Rehnquist’s 1959 article The Making of a Supreme Court Justice and more. If you find an article of historical importance or interest, please let us know by emailing editor[at]hlrecord.org. Thanks to the Harvard Law School library staff for their work on this project.

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News  /  April 17, 2013  / 

Announcing a New HLRecord Feature: HLS Lunches

As everyone at HLS knows, the primary (and, let’s be honest, often the only) reason to attend lunch events is the free food. We’ve all had that experience, though, of showing up to an event that looked mildly interesting only to find that its organizers were not even kind enough to spring for Felipe’s.  Or perhaps you’re one of those people who gets out of a morning class and immediately spends way too long checking every event on Calendar@Law to see where the Thai food is.  Maybe you blew your loan money on hornbooks and highlighters and you’re reduced to surviving on whatever cold pizza and Diet Coke you can glean at the end of the lunch hour. If any of these describes you (or even if not), then we have a tool we think you’ll like. Make free lunch freer.  Add http://www.hlrecord.org/hlslunches/ to your list of bookmarks, or click HLS … Continue reading

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